To engage students in advancing the agenda on gender equality, GATE offers a competition each year for student fellowships.

Students interested in being a student fellow can apply through the MBA in-program awards in May of each year.

Each selected MBA Fellow receives a bursary of $10,000 and commits to work on a project related to the mandate of GATE. Projects include a short video series on women’s experiences in companies, a whitepaper on women in STEM, guidelines for adapting MBA courses to be more inclusive and a strategy for attracting more women to MBA programs. Consulting firm Bain & Company is partnering with GATE to provide consultants who can guide and support the Fellows as they complete their projects.

2018-19 Student Fellows

Through the testimonies of twenty male Rotman MBA students, Verónica aimed to understand what it means to be a man in today's society, the challenges, and how these students understand and relate to the gender equality policies and actions underway. Further, she used these insights to propose three action plans in order to start the conversation and seize the opportunity to effectively include men by creating psychologically safe spaces for male students to raise questions, feel supported and be engaged while working towards achieving gender equality at Rotman.

Click here to read Verónica's final report.

Lechin launched the ROTMOM Project in September 2018. Through this project, she sought to better understand the experiences of mothers in MBA programs. Using design thinking, she documented and designed ways aspiring leaders, who are also mothers of young children, can advance through Rotman’s MBA programs. The end goal is gender parity not only in business schools, but in leadership roles across Canada. For this project, she interviewed 11 “ROTMOMs” from full-time, Morning/Evening and Executive MBA programs. They came from different industry backgrounds and have children aged from a few weeks old to early grade school.

Click here to read Lechin's final report.

Narjis proposed developing a podcast examining the phenomenon of "covering" in the workplace. Covering is a term that refers to how an individual restricts themselves from expressing their authentic selves in a variety of contexts. In the context of a work environment, covering can not only harm the individual but also hinder an organization’s ability to create a true culture of inclusion.In this podcast, Narjis interviews individuals who have covered or uncovered certain aspects of their identity in the workplace, such as their religion, ethnicity, marital status, disabilities, and sexual orientation.

Click here to listen to Narjis' podcast.

Through this research, Alicia aimed to understand why the capital markets industry has failed to attract and retain diverse talent. Despite being an incredibly lucrative career path, low recruitment and retention rates suggest that women are opting out of careers in capital markets, if they are choosing to enter the industry at all. In interviews with 18 men and women, currently or formerly employed in capital markets, her report provides five insights into why women are not choosing careers in this industry. Starting with gender stereotypes and industry-wide culture, this report highlights structural interventions that can improve an organization’s ability to attract and retain a more gender-diverse workforce.

Click here to read Alicia's final report.

Adil's project looked to assess the inherent bias that exists around corporate sponsorship in women’s sports, what its root causes are, and how it can be overcome so that decisions around sponsorship are taken with an unbiased gender lens. By utilizing case studies and interviews, as well as researching global best practices, he outlines five recommendations for increasing the coverage of women's sports globally that will ultimately help close the gender gap in sponsorship.

Click here to read Adil's final report.

Through her project, Alison sought to understand the current decision-making process of men with regards to parental leave. She wanted to learn what inhibited them or allowed them to access leave, and what that leave looked like, including use of vacation time and informal and unpaid leave. In gaining an understanding of their current behaviour, she identified ways that employers and policymakers can solve for the needs and obstacles of fathers.

Click here to read Alison's final report.

2017-18 Student Fellows

Ria sought to understand the lack of representation of women at the management level in Canada. Using video as her medium, she engaged current MBA students, alumni, and high-profile executives to address this issue through interviews, and found that “sponsorship” was a significant tool in solving the gender gap in business. Her final video series will not only answer what sponsorship is, but will also explore what it looks like in practice.
Click here to watch Ria's video series.
Vanessa proposed developing a podcast series exploring the “business case” for diversity and inclusion. Her podcast offers a discussion of why talking about the business case is not enough – we have to change the structures and systems that lead to inequality and inequity. The podcast series highlights companies and individuals, in a variety of sectors, that are working to move beyond the business case.
Click here to listen to Vanessa's podcast series.
Hilary began her project by exploring how to get more women into business school. In understanding the admission process, she realized that admissions collect 3-5 words that candidates and their referees use to describe each applicant. She predicted that there would be differences between the types of words used (feminine vs. masculine) to describe female and male applicants. She also hypothesized that an applicant’s use of masculine language would be predictive of admission to the MBA program. After reviewing a sample of over 2,700 applications, she came to a few key conclusions. 
Click here to view Hilary's findings.
Fatima sought to analyze how discussions about gender equality were presented in the core MBA curriculum at Rotman. She discovered, however, that this was an issue the Rotman administration had recently begun working to address, so she turned her attention instead to student perceptions. Using an online survey, she collected data on how students gauged the importance of including discussions of gender equality in the curriculum and found some surprising insights. 
Click here to view Fatima's findings.
Mark wanted to identify if there is a “leaky pipe” in terms of raw numbers of students starting and finishing STEM-focused undergraduate programs, and subsequently, if there are specific motivations and support required or received by students in order to solve the “leaky pipe” problem. This project was predominately occupied with exploring why the rates of women in STEM remain low relative to men in certain STEM-fields, such as engineering and computer science.
Mark's findings will be published later this summer.

2016-17 Student Fellows

Celeste is deeply committed to improving people's lives through sustainable, market-based solutions and spent nearly six years at the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation working in service of this mission – most recently with Co-chair Melinda Gates as her Associate Program Officer focused on how gender intersects with the foundation’s 27 different strategic program areas across global health, global development, and US education. She is currently pursuing an MBA at the University of Toronto as a Forté Fellow, building her business acumen and exploring opportunities to bring her multidisciplinary and consumer-centered approach to the private sector. Celeste graduated magna cum laude with departmental honors from The George Washington University in Washington D.C. where she earned a degree in Women’s Studies with a minor in Communication and was a Dean’s Scholar in Globalization. She also holds a certificate in Fundraising Management from the University of Washington.

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To engage students in advancing the agenda on gender equality, GATE offers a competition each year for student fellowships.

Each selected MBA Fellow receives a bursary of $10,000 and commits to work on a project related to the mandate of GATE. Projects include a short video series on women’s experiences in companies, a whitepaper on women in STEM, guidelines for adapting MBA courses to be more inclusive and a strategy for attracting more women to MBA programs. Consulting firm Bain & Company is partnering with GATE to provide consultants who can guide and support the Fellows as they complete their projects.

2018-19 Student Fellows

Through the testimonies of twenty male Rotman MBA students, Verónica aimed to understand what it means to be a man in today's society, the challenges, and how these students understand and relate to the gender equality policies and actions underway. Further, she used these insights to propose three action plans in order to start the conversation and seize the opportunity to effectively include men by creating psychologically safe spaces for male students to raise questions, feel supported and be engaged while working towards achieving gender equality at Rotman.

Click here to read Verónica's final report.

Lechin launched the ROTMOM Project in September 2018. Through this project, she sought to better understand the experiences of mothers in MBA programs. Using design thinking, she documented and designed ways aspiring leaders, who are also mothers of young children, can advance through Rotman’s MBA programs. The end goal is gender parity not only in business schools, but in leadership roles across Canada. For this project, she interviewed 11 “ROTMOMs” from full-time, Morning/Evening and Executive MBA programs. They came from different industry backgrounds and have children aged from a few weeks old to early grade school.

Click here to read Lechin's final report.

Narjis proposed developing a podcast examining the phenomenon of "covering" in the workplace. Covering is a term that refers to how an individual restricts themselves from expressing their authentic selves in a variety of contexts. In the context of a work environment, covering can not only harm the individual but also hinder an organization’s ability to create a true culture of inclusion.In this podcast, Narjis interviews individuals who have covered or uncovered certain aspects of their identity in the workplace, such as their religion, ethnicity, marital status, disabilities, and sexual orientation.

Click here to listen to Narjis' podcast.

Through this research, Alicia aimed to understand why the capital markets industry has failed to attract and retain diverse talent. Despite being an incredibly lucrative career path, low recruitment and retention rates suggest that women are opting out of careers in capital markets, if they are choosing to enter the industry at all. In interviews with 18 men and women, currently or formerly employed in capital markets, her report provides five insights into why women are not choosing careers in this industry. Starting with gender stereotypes and industry-wide culture, this report highlights structural interventions that can improve an organization’s ability to attract and retain a more gender-diverse workforce.

Click here to read Alicia's final report.

Adil's project looked to assess the inherent bias that exists around corporate sponsorship in women’s sports, what its root causes are, and how it can be overcome so that decisions around sponsorship are taken with an unbiased gender lens. By utilizing case studies and interviews, as well as researching global best practices, he outlines five recommendations for increasing the coverage of women's sports globally that will ultimately help close the gender gap in sponsorship.

Click here to read Adil's final report.

Through her project, Alison sought to understand the current decision-making process of men with regards to parental leave. She wanted to learn what inhibited them or allowed them to access leave, and what that leave looked like, including use of vacation time and informal and unpaid leave. In gaining an understanding of their current behaviour, she identified ways that employers and policymakers can solve for the needs and obstacles of fathers.

Click here to read Alison's final report.

2017-18 Student Fellows

Ria sought to understand the lack of representation of women at the management level in Canada. Using video as her medium, she engaged current MBA students, alumni, and high-profile executives to address this issue through interviews, and found that “sponsorship” was a significant tool in solving the gender gap in business. Her final video series will not only answer what sponsorship is, but will also explore what it looks like in practice.
Click here to watch Ria's video series.
Vanessa proposed developing a podcast series exploring the “business case” for diversity and inclusion. Her podcast offers a discussion of why talking about the business case is not enough – we have to change the structures and systems that lead to inequality and inequity. The podcast series highlights companies and individuals, in a variety of sectors, that are working to move beyond the business case.
Click here to listen to Vanessa's podcast series.
Hilary began her project by exploring how to get more women into business school. In understanding the admission process, she realized that admissions collect 3-5 words that candidates and their referees use to describe each applicant. She predicted that there would be differences between the types of words used (feminine vs. masculine) to describe female and male applicants. She also hypothesized that an applicant’s use of masculine language would be predictive of admission to the MBA program. After reviewing a sample of over 2,700 applications, she came to a few key conclusions. 
Click here to view Hilary's findings.
Fatima sought to analyze how discussions about gender equality were presented in the core MBA curriculum at Rotman. She discovered, however, that this was an issue the Rotman administration had recently begun working to address, so she turned her attention instead to student perceptions. Using an online survey, she collected data on how students gauged the importance of including discussions of gender equality in the curriculum and found some surprising insights. 
Click here to view Fatima's findings.
Mark wanted to identify if there is a “leaky pipe” in terms of raw numbers of students starting and finishing STEM-focused undergraduate programs, and subsequently, if there are specific motivations and support required or received by students in order to solve the “leaky pipe” problem. This project was predominately occupied with exploring why the rates of women in STEM remain low relative to men in certain STEM-fields, such as engineering and computer science.
Mark's findings will be published later this summer.

2016-17 Student Fellows

Celeste is deeply committed to improving people's lives through sustainable, market-based solutions and spent nearly six years at the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation working in service of this mission – most recently with Co-chair Melinda Gates as her Associate Program Officer focused on how gender intersects with the foundation’s 27 different strategic program areas across global health, global development, and US education. She is currently pursuing an MBA at the University of Toronto as a Forté Fellow, building her business acumen and exploring opportunities to bring her multidisciplinary and consumer-centered approach to the private sector. Celeste graduated magna cum laude with departmental honors from The George Washington University in Washington D.C. where she earned a degree in Women’s Studies with a minor in Communication and was a Dean’s Scholar in Globalization. She also holds a certificate in Fundraising Management from the University of Washington.

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